The Oxford Book of Modern Fairy Tales

The Oxford Book of Modern Fairy Tales Most people think of fairy tales as having been created anonymously and almost magically long ago and later discovered and recorded by scholars such as the Brothers Grimm In fact original fairy tales

  • Title: The Oxford Book of Modern Fairy Tales
  • Author: Alison Lurie Donald Barthelme Lord Dunsany Carl Sandburg George MacDonald Charles Dickens Howard Pyle Mary De Morgan
  • ISBN: 9780192823854
  • Page: 218
  • Format: Paperback
  • Most people think of fairy tales as having been created anonymously and almost magically long ago, and later discovered and recorded by scholars such as the Brothers Grimm In fact original fairy tales are still being written Over the last century and a half many well known authors have used the characters and settings and themes of traditional tales such as Cinderella ,Most people think of fairy tales as having been created anonymously and almost magically long ago, and later discovered and recorded by scholars such as the Brothers Grimm In fact original fairy tales are still being written Over the last century and a half many well known authors have used the characters and settings and themes of traditional tales such as Cinderella , Hansel and Gretel , and Beauty and the Beast to produce new and characteristic works of wonder and enchantment The Oxford Book of Modern Fairy Tales brings together forty of the best of these stories by British and American writers from John Ruskin and Nathaniel Hawthorne to I B Singer and Angela Carter These tales are full of princes and princesses, witches and dragons and talking animals, magic objects, evil spells, and unexpected endings Some of their authors, like John Ruskin and Oscar Wilde, use the form to point a social or spiritual moral others such as Jeanne Desy and Richard Kennedy, turn the traditional stories inside out to extraordinary effect James Thurber, Bernard Malamud, and Donald Barthelme, among many others, bring the characters and plots of the traditional fairy tale into the contemporary world to make satiric comments on modern life The literary skill, wit, and sophistication of these stories appeal to an adult audience, even though some of them were originally written for children They include light hearted comic fairy stories like Charles Dickens s The Magic Fishbone and L F Baum s The Queen of Quok , thoughtful and often moving tales like Lord Dunsany s The Kith of the Elf Folk and Philip K Dick s The King of the Elves , and profoundly disturbing ones like Lucy LaneClifford s The New Mother , and Ursula Le Guin s The Wife s Story Together they prove that the fairy tale is not only one of the most popular and enduring forms, but a significant and continually developing part of literature.

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    About " Alison Lurie Donald Barthelme Lord Dunsany Carl Sandburg George MacDonald Charles Dickens Howard Pyle Mary De Morgan "

  • Alison Lurie Donald Barthelme Lord Dunsany Carl Sandburg George MacDonald Charles Dickens Howard Pyle Mary De Morgan

    Alison Lurie b 1926 is a Pulitzer Prize winning author of fiction and nonfiction Born in Chicago and raised in White Plains, New York, she joined the English department at Cornell University in 1970, where she taught courses on children s literature, among others Her first novel, Love and Friendship 1962 , is a story of romance and deception among the faculty of a snowbound New England college It won favorable reviews and established her as a keen observer of love in academia It was followed by the well received The Nowhere City 1966 and The War Between the Tates 1974 In 1984, she published Foreign Affairs, her best known novel, which traces the erotic entanglements of two American professors in England It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985 Her most recent novel is The Last Resort 1998 In addition to her novels, Lurie s interest in children s literature led to three collections of folk tales and two critical studies of the genre Lurie officially retired from Cornell in 1998, but continues to teach and write In 2012, she was awarded a two year term as the official author of the state of New York Lurie lives in Ithaca, New York, and is married to the writer Edward Hower She has three grown sons and three grandchildren.

  • 478 Comments

  • This has been my sleep companion for some time - takes longer if you only manage a paragraph a night, but its a good one. I'd never read the Reluctant Dragon (sad, I know). The stories are in 'chronological' order, so in a sense its a history of fairy tales. The oldest is from 1839, and was much sillier than I'd expected. No idea why - it had not occurred to me that people were silly in 1839, I guess. Clearly, something lacking in our approach to history.Some were familiar and comfortable, like [...]


  • Fairy tales (that often don’t have a single fairy in them) old and new dot the pages of this book. If anyone has read the modern graphic novels in the “Fables” series, they will recognize the character of Feathertop from this story, a patchwork scarecrow made of sticks, ragged finery and a withered pumpkin. This story was created by Nathaniel Hawthorne, he of “The Scarlet Letter” fame, and tells the moral of how the world is filled with stuffed men with no more sense than a pumpkinhead [...]


  • When I hear the word fairy tale, I envision something like this :And in the end:Maybe because I grew up reading stories like Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk, I think fairy tales should have a happy ending and a MEANING, however simple it may be. Likewise, the words "Modern Fairy Tales" snagged me. Ooh! Some modern stories! Lets cuddle up on my bed and read! Best book ever! NOT. First of all, the word "modern" is ahuge lie. The words were so old-fashioned I couldn't understand what the stor [...]


  • "The Oxford Book of Modern Fairy Tales" is exactly what it says it is - a book of modern fairy tales.And, what is a modern fairy tale, you ask?It's pretty much the same as a traditional fairy tale. There's one or two with a dragon, one with a nymph, a few with fairies, a lot with princes and princesses, etc.But a modern fairy tale has a modern twist to it. "The Princess Who Stood on Her Own Two Feet" is a fantastic feminist story about a princess who changes everything about herself so a prince [...]


  • This book has fairy tales of all kinds, written from 1839 to 1989. There are various authors, some of the most famous being Charles Dickens, Carl Sandburg, Jane Yolen, T.H. White, Kenneth Grahame, Oscar Wilde, and E. Nesbit. The stories in this book are often very creative twists on traditional fairy tales, though some are more interesting than others. One of the stories, "The Glass Mountain", made very little sense and was simply confusing, while the last story, "Old Man Potchikoo", was just pl [...]


  • A wonderful collection of stories, all worth reading and a number truly extraordinary. The New Mother by Lucy Lane Clifford may be the creepiest story I've ever read, the Kith of the Elf Folk by Lord Dunsany is as wild and unpredictable and haunting as its protagonist. The older, Victorian and Edwardian stories are the stranger ones though, the modern ones being more riffs on familiar themes, but those old stories carry the scent of the unexpected and, indeed, of faerie itself.


  • I absolutely love the authors' sophisticated, contemplative style of writing and the selection of stories with the most unusual flavor of plotlines, while still retaining that wonderful, magical fairytale feeling.




  • I'm still reading this but I love it so much and keep dipping into it and re-reading stories.It includes my favourite fairy tale ever, "The Princess Who Stood On Her Own Two Feet" by Jeanne Desy.


  • I wish I could rate each of the stories separately, as some I loved, and some I wasn't so keen on (as always with collections like this).



  • Historically, this is a very interesting collection to read as the values and artistry in each author's work reflected the literary and cultural leanings of the era in which it was written as well as the author's individual style. All of them are well crafted.This is a collection gathered for adults. Some of the stories were written with a young audience in mind but many were simply written as artistry for adults, so this collection will be of more interest to someone interested in the history o [...]


  • This a great selection of more recent fairy tales written by English and American authors. It is a wide selection, taking fairy tale, in some cases, into new realms -- but is there, truly, a 'new realm' for fairy tale. The more modern fairy tales in this book have exciting twists and surprise endings that make you smile or gasp. It is always a good thing to bring the contemporary world into old, established genres and make them relevant for today. Still, the tradition of fairy tale has always be [...]


  • I am a woman who will never outgrow fairytales. This collection was published in 1993, and I only wish I had got my hands on it back in the second grade! In any case, I've finally read it through now. Lucky me!With authors including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, H.G. Wells, Philip K. Dick, Angela Carter, and Ursula Le Guin, this fairytale collection spans over 150 years and features stories that I had never read, nor even heard of before now. And that is saying something. Ma [...]


  • OK, I admit it. I never stopped reading Fairy Tales. Never will, either, as long as books like this one come out. A first-rate collectionof some new, some old favorites. All the Victorian gems are there - Dickens' Magic Fishbone,The Light Princess by George MacDonald, some great dragon stories like Stockton's The Griffin and the Minor Canon, and E. Nesbit as well, but there were delightful surprises like Sylvia Townsend Warner's Bluebeard's Daughter. A gem of a book!



  • A comprehensive collection of 19th and 20th century fairy tale,; some familiar, others less so. An enjoyable read for fairy tales fans of all ages.


  • Like a box of chocolates. Some I enjoyed more than others, and I didn't eat them all. I especially loved Sylvia's Townsend Warner's "Bluebeard's Daughter."


  • Endless enjoyment and insight from these diverse authors drawn to a mythical style of expression. They are teaching me a lot about how to write a good modern fairy tale.





  • I loved the different stories that make up the book and the lessons it teaches you about things and just life in general.


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